Wow. Hacker Court

hacks, legal, education

Wow. When did I not hear about Hacker Court?!?!

Hacker Court is an organization of professionals from legal and technical fields researching the challenges of presenting technical evidence in court. Many computer forensic presentations are one-dimensional viewpoints, usually from the Prosecution perspective. However, the U.S. Justice system operates on the presumption of innocence, not guilt. Justice is best served when both prosecution and defense are properly presented. Computer forensic experts must analyze and interpret technical evidence in simple terms that jurors, attorneys and judges can understand. It's one thing to analyze and interpret technical data for colleagues - it's much more difficult to explain it to the average grandmother.

Send me S/MIME encrypted email...

hacks, open source, secrecy

You can now send me S/MIME encrypted email... and if you use GMail and Firefox, you can use the S/MIME Firefox extension for Gmail, too! To download the certificate for my Digital ID: http://josephhall.org/SMIME.txt .

UPDATE [2005-09-13 20:34:36]: Is it just me, or is it difficult to advertise your S/MIME certificate? With GPG/PGP, there are keyservers like http://pgp.mit.edu/ and the ability to export keys.

Firefox 1.0.6, bad

hacks, open source

So, I've determined that Firefox 1.0.6 is not right for me... I'm going to stick to 1.0.5 until the 1.5 version comes out (and possibly even until all my favorite extensions are tooled to run in 1.5).

I describe why I chose to revert to 1.0.5 and how you can do this (on the Mac, mostly) below the fold:

(If you're reading through a reader: Did you know I have full-content feeds, too?)

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Way meta...

blogging, friends, exercise

Folks out there in Bloglandia seem really often to run up against the same kinds of concerns at the same moments, without necessarily knowing about one another, as though there?s something in the zeitgeist that suddenly makes its way to consciousness in multiple locales at once. Witness Shauna?s thoughts on the cumulative effects of her recent blog silence and Mel?s musings on the downside of binge writing. Both intersect with something I?ve been pondering for the last couple of months?that when I write every day, whether here at Planned Obsolescence or elsewhere, on other projects, writing gets easier and easier. Not just in terms of the production of sentences, though that of course comes more smoothly, but also in the production of thoughts, of things worth writing about. (from Kathleen's "Practice, Practice, Practice")

Ah, Security

system, secrecy, berkeley, policy
(So, I actually debated with myself as to whether or not I should blog this... in the end, I figured I should. Hopefully, no one will loose their job and any remedy won't cost Berkeley's EECS department too much in terms of resources.)

I was going to a meeting today in Soda Hall (the Computer Science building on the Berkeley campus) when I stepped on something that jingled while crossing the street in front of Cory Hall (the Engineering building on campus). At first, I thought the sound came from some coins in the road and I was in too much of a hurry to see if they were quarters (for laundry!). However, I noted the jingle was a little more musical than with coins.

When I looked down, I saw a set of three Berkeley keys.

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